Book thread

for general chat about stuff

Moderator: moderators

Re: Book thread

Postby Logorrhea » December 23rd, 2014, 2:44 pm

One of my favourite books of all times. Very very excited.
User avatar
Logorrhea
Malcolm O'Kelly
 
Posts: 3815
Joined: October 2nd, 2007, 1:20 pm
Location: D24

Re: Book thread

Postby Dave Cahill » March 12th, 2015, 4:44 pm

Sir Terry Pratchett, author of the Discworld series of novels who had early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, has died aged 66, his publishers have announced.

He passed away in his home, with his cat sleeping on his bed surrounded by his family on Thursday.

He completed his last book, a new Discworld novel, in the summer of 2014.

Larry Finlay, MD at Transworld Publishers, said in a statement: “The world has lost one of its brightest, sharpest minds.”
I have Bumbleflex
User avatar
Dave Cahill
Jamie Heaslip
 
Posts: 19954
Joined: January 24th, 2006, 4:32 pm
Location: None of your damn business

Re: Book thread

Postby Dave Cahill » March 12th, 2015, 4:47 pm

@terryandrob: AT LAST, SIR TERRY, WE MUST WALK TOGETHER.
@terryandrob: Terry took Death’s arm and followed him through the doors and on to the black desert under the endless night.
@terryandrob: The End.
I have Bumbleflex
User avatar
Dave Cahill
Jamie Heaslip
 
Posts: 19954
Joined: January 24th, 2006, 4:32 pm
Location: None of your damn business

Re: Book thread

Postby IanD » March 12th, 2015, 4:58 pm

Dave Cahill wrote:@terryandrob: AT LAST, SIR TERRY, WE MUST WALK TOGETHER.
@terryandrob: Terry took Death’s arm and followed him through the doors and on to the black desert under the endless night.
@terryandrob: The End.


Great last tweets.

Am really gutted to hear Terry Pratchett passed away. Great author and I thought he handled his illness with great dignity.

Have just checked and I am 2 short of the adult Discworld novels. Off to bookshop to rectify that now - may introduce my 9 year old niece to the kids books soon.
Treat life like a dog: If you can't eat it, play with it, or hump it, p1$$ on it and walk away!
User avatar
IanD
Official Mascot
 
Posts: 1265
Joined: May 2nd, 2006, 1:51 pm
Location: Wicklow Town

Re: Book thread

Postby Logorrhea » March 12th, 2015, 5:43 pm

I remember a few years back, after his diagnosis, he took part in a documentary on assisted suicide. One of the saddest documentaries I've ever watched. At the time, and consistently since he has always professed his desire to leave before Alzheimer's took its toll.

On a side point, Amazon have quite a lot of the discworld novels in a clothbound hardcover collection. Not all of them but all the early ones up to a point. About 20 in all. Just search for the "Discworld Hardback Library". If you are a fan or a collector they are very well presented versions of some classic books. I'd highly recommend.
User avatar
Logorrhea
Malcolm O'Kelly
 
Posts: 3815
Joined: October 2nd, 2007, 1:20 pm
Location: D24

Re: Book thread

Postby johng » March 12th, 2015, 6:19 pm

The younger you get it the quicker you go. Raygun and Thatcher lasted a long time.......
User avatar
johng
Leo Cullen
 
Posts: 16403
Joined: March 23rd, 2009, 11:37 pm
Location: Behind You!!

Re: Book thread

Postby Peg Leg » March 12th, 2015, 11:23 pm

Gutted!
I hope DEATH & Binky or maybe that should be Om takes good care of him!
"It was Mrs O'Leary's cow"
Daniel Sullivan
User avatar
Peg Leg
Devin Toner
 
Posts: 7758
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 6:08 pm
Location: Procrastinasia

Re: Book thread

Postby TerenureJim » April 1st, 2015, 12:11 pm

Anyone lined up any good reads for the long weekend stretching before us?
User avatar
TerenureJim
Rob Kearney
 
Posts: 4859
Joined: May 5th, 2009, 10:09 am

Re: Book thread

Postby TerenureJim » April 27th, 2015, 10:19 pm

Can any discworkd aficionados point me towards the best novel (or novels) to get into the world of Prachett?
User avatar
TerenureJim
Rob Kearney
 
Posts: 4859
Joined: May 5th, 2009, 10:09 am

Re: Book thread

Postby Logorrhea » April 27th, 2015, 10:34 pm

TerenureJim wrote:Can any discworkd aficionados point me towards the best novel (or novels) to get into the world of Prachett?


Mort would probably be the most popular. Was the one that got me started anyway.
User avatar
Logorrhea
Malcolm O'Kelly
 
Posts: 3815
Joined: October 2nd, 2007, 1:20 pm
Location: D24

Re: Book thread

Postby Dave Cahill » April 27th, 2015, 11:22 pm

Logorrhea wrote:
TerenureJim wrote:Can any discworkd aficionados point me towards the best novel (or novels) to get into the world of Prachett?


Mort would probably be the most popular. Was the one that got me started anyway.


Its a good call - that or Guards! Guards! I think (though that could because I love the City Watch stuff)
I have Bumbleflex
User avatar
Dave Cahill
Jamie Heaslip
 
Posts: 19954
Joined: January 24th, 2006, 4:32 pm
Location: None of your damn business

Re: Book thread

Postby domhnallj » April 28th, 2015, 6:18 am

Colour of magic was my first. Mort is cool too. Basically any of the older ones are the best place to start.
"That was shiterarse coaches need to look at themselves this is as bad at is.beem with school. Items impeovrnkyb neefedc"

Golf Man sums up the mood of a nation
User avatar
domhnallj
Girvan Dempsey
 
Posts: 2405
Joined: May 19th, 2011, 9:12 am

Re: Book thread

Postby Peg Leg » April 28th, 2015, 2:22 pm

I too read Mort as my first, but if I was to start again I'd read them in order (I think colour of magic is the first). So many minor characters and ideas become major components over the course of the books. Never a huge fan of the witch books but small gods was a favourite before the nights watch books. Great timeless satirical pieces.
"It was Mrs O'Leary's cow"
Daniel Sullivan
User avatar
Peg Leg
Devin Toner
 
Posts: 7758
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 6:08 pm
Location: Procrastinasia

Re: Book thread

Postby nc6000 » May 9th, 2015, 12:27 am

Have any of you tried photocopying a book from a Kindle? :wink:

Image
User avatar
nc6000
Mullet
 
Posts: 1553
Joined: June 25th, 2007, 8:17 pm

Re: Book thread

Postby TerenureJim » May 18th, 2015, 1:26 pm

Peg Leg wrote:I too read Mort as my first, but if I was to start again I'd read them in order (I think colour of magic is the first). So many minor characters and ideas become major components over the course of the books. Never a huge fan of the witch books but small gods was a favourite before the nights watch books. Great timeless satirical pieces.


I was very luckily treated to a hardback copy of Feet of Clay by my better half, fantastic reading so far, and the hardback library editions are simply stunning books.
User avatar
TerenureJim
Rob Kearney
 
Posts: 4859
Joined: May 5th, 2009, 10:09 am

Re: Book thread

Postby BarryP » September 28th, 2015, 4:54 pm

Just picked up "Dub Sub Confidential". Really looking forward to it.

Seems a fascinating character - has a website/blog called "soberpaddy.com"

Dub Sub Confidential : A Goalkeeper's Life with - and Without - the Dubs

Quick Overview:

Dub Sub Confidential by John Leonard: a GAA memoir like no other. John Leonard was a gifted Gaelic football goalkeeper who had the misfortune to reach his prime at the same time, and in the same county, as one of the all-time greats: Stephen Cluxton. Unless something happened to Clucko, Leonard was always going to be number 2. Of course, it didn't help that he had a problem with drink and drugs...Dub Sub Confidential is John Leonard's vivid, witty and searingly honest account of his life in and out of sport. He was both a committed Dub and a sceptical observer of the goings on in the dressing-room and on the training pitch. He writes about the players and the mentors, and about the oddity of being part of the GAA's biggest circus while never expecting to get on the pitch. And he writes brilliantly about the demons that led him to addiction, his efforts for many years to party hard and train hard, and his eventual breakthrough to sobriety. Dub Sub Confidential is a GAA memoir like no other yet published - a book about how Gaelic games collide with real life. It is also a brilliant read from a remarkable personality.
No feelings. You don't win 'em all, you don't love 'em all, you keep on fighting and if you need a friend, get a dog."
BarryP
Knowledgeable
 
Posts: 347
Joined: October 2nd, 2006, 5:17 pm
Location: Dublin

Re: Book thread

Postby TerenureJim » October 3rd, 2015, 8:38 am

The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch - lovely paced book, not a perfect read, one or two plot threads a bit too dues ex machina, but nothing too worrying. Just a very entertaining and great opening gambit to a supposed 7 book series (3 published to date, 4th due in 2016). Think Oceans 11 set in a land that's part medevial Venice and part Game of Thrones. Great world building and not ott on the fantasy.
User avatar
TerenureJim
Rob Kearney
 
Posts: 4859
Joined: May 5th, 2009, 10:09 am

Re: Book thread

Postby Peg Leg » October 3rd, 2015, 1:11 pm

Working my way to through the collected works of H P Lovecraft. Great writing from a very obviously tortured soul.
"It was Mrs O'Leary's cow"
Daniel Sullivan
User avatar
Peg Leg
Devin Toner
 
Posts: 7758
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 6:08 pm
Location: Procrastinasia

Re: Book thread

Postby fourthirtythree » October 3rd, 2015, 1:52 pm

Peg Leg wrote:Working my way to through the collected works of H P Lovecraft. Great writing from a very obviously tortured soul.


While I am fond of Lovecraft, I don't think even his greatest fans would suggest his writing is "great" - grotesque, cyclopean, unwieldy, prose stretched into strange geometries of madness. As he might say himself...
Datta: what have we given?
My friend, blood shaking my heart
The awful daring of a moment's surrender
Which an age of prudence can never retract
What the thunder said to Brian Lenihan
User avatar
fourthirtythree
Devin Toner
 
Posts: 8409
Joined: April 12th, 2008, 11:33 pm
Location: Eight miles high

Re: Book thread

Postby Peg Leg » October 3rd, 2015, 11:12 pm

fourthirtythree wrote:
Peg Leg wrote:Working my way to through the collected works of H P Lovecraft. Great writing from a very obviously tortured soul.


While I am fond of Lovecraft, I don't think even his greatest fans would suggest his writing is "great" - grotesque, cyclopean, unwieldy, prose stretched into strange geometries of madness. As he might say himself...

I joked with a friend earlier that I mustn't be the first to have gone through Lovecraft in this order. Google can now anticipate the next word I do not recognise
"It was Mrs O'Leary's cow"
Daniel Sullivan
User avatar
Peg Leg
Devin Toner
 
Posts: 7758
Joined: February 1st, 2010, 6:08 pm
Location: Procrastinasia

PreviousNext

Return to General Chat

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests